Surrender and Acceptance (20220427)

Oh that I had been more awake when I was young!

~ Cheryl N.

Such an Ah-Ha! moment to pass on to the “younger” generation. In our current times of war, disinformation, far-right and far-left politics, and roller coaster economy, it’s good to focus on passing on the lessons we’ve learned along the road of life.

In a recent April 24, 2022 post by Jason Kotecki (aka Escape Adulthood), entitled “Beautiful Questions from Ugly Cookies”, he writes about our defensiveness, our leaning toward “yes, but” conversations instead of “yes, and,” and our bent to fall into the comparison trap. They all appear to have one common thread: our unwillingness to surrender, accept and be grateful for where and who we are. It may not be his original intent, so for you, I will toss out a few snippets from his article and let you decide (please take some time to read the whole post):

“Which makes me wonder why we are so defensive when someone suggests a way for us to improve something? Maybe it was the seriousness – or lack thereof – of the situation? Or the intent of the messenger?”

What would happen if we decided to take ALL advice with gracious open-mindedness, regardless of the intent or tone of the messenger?

“This “yes, and” approach popularized by the art of improvisational comedy engenders a supportive environment for risk-taking, by making the process a shared one.”

What would your organization – or families!? – look like if we supported risk-taking rather than stifling by punishing failure?

“And sometimes we end up in a much different place on an undertaking than we thought we would when we began. It’s easy to grow frustrated and discouraged as we struggle to force our current circumstances to match our initial vision.”

What if we embraced the POTENTIAL and BEAUTY of where we are NOW instead of comparing it to where we thought we’d be instead?

Answering these questions and the final question “What is something beautiful about where you are right now, even if it’s different than what you originally expected?” points us to being more grateful for life’s ups and downs, twists and turns. It also leads me to Cheryl’s Ah-Ha! statement: “Oh that I had been more awake when I was young!

Going back in time may not be possible and perhaps the best way forward is to help those who are young…passing on a legacy of learning and experience. To take risks, accept advice and suggestions, and to cherish even the smallest thing in our current life’s situation. To get a more positive angle on today and a better outlook for tomorrow…for we are all as young as we feel and today is a great day to start…perhaps, re-start…so when we look in the read-view mirror of age, we can do it with a smile and a heart full of gratitude.

(for a glimpse at looking back with vigor, check out Yes2Next video interview of Estelle: “Secrets of longevity from a 90-year-old senior)